Chemically Induced Brain Cancer in Sprague-Dawley Rats: Changed Lipidomics Mimics the Human Conditions

Authors

  • A. Leskanicova Institute of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia
  • P. Simko Institute of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia
  • N. Zidekova Department of Pharmacology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University, Slovakia
  • M. Babincak Institute of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia
  • A. Blicharova Faculty of Management Science and Informatics, University of Zilina, Zilina, Slovakia
  • M. Kertys Department of Pharmacology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University, Slovakia
  • J. Kostolný Faculty of Management Science and Informatics, University of Zilina, Zilina, Slovakia
  • D. Maceková Faculty of Management Science and Informatics, University of Zilina, Zilina, Slovakia
  • T. Kiskova Institute of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Kosice, Slovakia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.30683/1927-7229.2024.13.01

Keywords:

Brain cancer, metabolomics, lipid metabolism, phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins

Abstract

Malignant gliomas are one of the most treatment-refractory cancers. Development of resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies contributes to these tumors’ aggressive phenotypes. Elevated lipid levels in gliomas have been reported for the last 50 years. However, the molecular mechanisms of how tumor tissues obtain lipids and utilize them are not well understood.In our study, 48.6% of phosphatidylcholines were significantly changed during an early stage of brain cancer in females, and 66.2% in males. As for lysophosphatidylcholines 57.1% metabolites were significantly changed in female, and 64.3% in male rats. We observed the most interesting results in the group of sphingomyelins, where 85.8% metabolites were significantly elevated during brain cancer. According to VIP projection, the most important metabolites were: PC ae C40:3, PC ae C38:1, PC ae C30:1, PC ae C38:3, PC ae C44:3, PC aa C40:2, PC aa C42:0, PC ae C30:2, SM C20:2, PC aa C42:1 in females, and PC ae C38:1, PC ae C40:3, PC ae C30:1, PC ae C42:1, SM C20:2, PC aa C34:4, PC ae C38:4, PC aa C32:2, PC aa C38:5, lysoPC a C14:0. The identification of lipid biomarkers during the early stage of cancer could improve patient prognosis.

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Published

2024-04-22

How to Cite

Leskanicova, A., Simko, P., Zidekova, N. ., Babincak, M., Blicharova, A., Kertys, M., Kostolný, J., Maceková, D., & Kiskova, T. (2024). Chemically Induced Brain Cancer in Sprague-Dawley Rats: Changed Lipidomics Mimics the Human Conditions. Journal of Analytical Oncology, 13, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.30683/1927-7229.2024.13.01

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